Hurricanes are severe tropical storms that form in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Hurricanes gather heat and energy through contact with warm ocean waters. Evaporation from the seawater increases their power.

A hurricane is a huge storm! It can be up to 600 miles across and have strong winds spiraling inward and upward at speeds of 75 to 200 mph. Each hurricane usually lasts for over a week, moving 10-20 miles per hour over the open ocean.

Hurricanes need warm tropical oceans, moisture and light winds above them. If the right conditions last long enough, a hurricane can produce violent winds, incredible waves, torrential rains and floods.

Hurricanes rotate in a counter-clockwise direction around an "eye." Hurricanes have winds at least 74 miles per hour. When they come onto land, the heavy rain, strong winds and heavy waves can damage buildings, trees and cars. The heavy waves are called a storm surge. Storm surges are very dangerous and a major reason why you MUST stay away from the ocean during a hurricane warning or hurricane.

Storm surges are frequently the most devastating element of a hurricane. As a hurricane’s winds spiral around and around the storm, they push water into a mound at the storm’s center. This mound of water becomes dangerous when the storm reaches land because it causes flooding along the coast. The water piles up, unable to escape anywhere but on land as the storm carries it landward. A hurricane will cause more storm surge in areas where the ocean floor slopes gradually. This causes major flooding.

Hurricane Stages
Tropical
Wave
A low pressure trough moving generally westward with the trade winds.
Tropical
Disturbance
An organized area of thunderstorms that usually forms in the tropics. Typically, they maintain their identity for 24 hours and are accompanied by heavy rains and gusty winds.
Tropical
Cyclone
A generic term for any organized low pressure that develops over tropical and sometimes sub-tropical waters. Tropical depressions, tropical storms, and hurricanes are all example of tropical cyclones.
Tropical
Depression
An organized area of low pressure in which sustained winds are 38 mph or less.
Tropical
Storm
A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained wind speeds that range from 39 to 73 mph.
Hurricane A tropical cyclone with sustained winds of at least 74 mph.

The name of a really big and destructive hurricane can be "retired". Hurricanes In the eastern U.S., tend to form between June and November, with September being the most active month. The costs of hurricane damages are in the billions. Many people ignore the warnings to evacuate because they do not believe that the hurricanes will be that bad.

If you live in a hurrican area, maybe it is time to consider moving to Kingman, AZ.
Are you living in a high risk area for natural disasters?
Wildfires Earthquakes Flooding Mud Slides
Volcanoes Tornadoes Hurricanes Winter Weather
When You Live in Kingman, You Can Get Away From Nature's Fury!
No Wildfires No Earthquakes No Tornadoes No Hail
No Volcanoes No Hurricanes No MudslidesNo Flooding
No Ice or Bitter Winter Weather, and a rare Snow only lasts till noon!
Kingman AZ is A Great Place To Live!
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